seeing is believing episode 1: autumn 2002 episode .
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Philippines
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First the jokes, then a revolution
In North America, texting on cell phones remains practically unheard of, and sometimes even called geeky.
But for the average Filipino, a day doesn't go by without texting a minimum of 15 people. It's an affordable way to get a hold of someone, to get crucial info out to people, and even a great way to tell jokes. Texting became such a huge trend on this 7,000 island country, that when the time came, cell phones spawned a political revolution in the Philippines.
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In January 2001, President Estrada was on trial facing charges of bribery, corruption and breach of the public trust. Despite mounting evidence against him, the President was let off the hook.
That sparked it. I mean, people saw it on television, and a lot of people were revolted, they started text messaging each other, sending each other messages over the Internet, and that thing created a combustion, explains Ramon Isberto, a vice-president at Smart Telecom in the Philippines.
Because of texting and e-mail, within two hours over 200,000 people converged in the main street of Manila, demanding that the president resign. The vigil lasted for four days and four nights, until President Estrada finally got the message and resigned.

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